Mango and Coconut Rice Salad

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I’ve made this Yotam Ottolenghi Mango and Coconut Rice Salad a number of times, it’s a firm favorite. A couple of things though; don’t use rancid coconut flakes, make sure they’re relatively fresh, nothing worse than munching on rancid coconut flakes. Also, it’s currently the arse end of the alphonso mango season at the moment, so do yourself a favour and pop down to your local exotic ingredients shop and buy some; your taste buds will thank you.

Quinoa Salad with Dried Iranian Lime

This is one of those Yotam Ottolenghi recipes that we don’t make enough, it’s really delicious. Just go easy on the dried lime though, as it’s very potent and pungent. Making this dish isn’t with out a bit of middle class angst though, mainly caused by reading Can vegans stomach the unpalatable truth about quinoa? on The Guardian website

If you’re struggling to find any dried lime, then pop down to your local Asian supermarket, if you’re lucky enough to have one. We have the most excellent Nasreen Dar in Cambridge, which is one of my first ports of call when I need to pick up some more esoteric ingredients.

Denis Cotter for Dinner

Portobello mushroom & aduki bean gratin with roast parsnip crust

My brother was round for dinner the other weekend, so I took the opportunity to break out Denis Cotter’s For The Love Of Food and cook a couple of recipes for the second time. I’d cooked both of these a few months ago when my Sister and Brother-in-law were down for a weekend and have been itching to cook them again. These are just some notes to remind myself to tweak various bits if I come to cook them again.

Portobello mushroom & aduki bean gratin with roast parsnip crust
The title of this one makes it sound really grand, but it’s essentially just a posh shepherds pie and a damn tasty one at that. If you’re going to use dried aduki beans, then you need to give them plenty of soaking time and allow up to 75 minutes or so for them to cook. If you don’t allow enough time, you can end up serving dinner rather on the late side, which is what happened the first time I cooked this. I could have just used a tin of beans, but I’m sure it wouldn’t have been quite as good.

You may also need to vary the cooking time of the portobello mushrooms depending on their size and how ruberry you like them. Personally, I like my mushrooms cooked within an inch of their life, so ten minutes isn’t enough if they are really large. This time I gave them fifteen minutes and they were still rather on the bouncy side for my liking, although it may help to chop them into slightly smaller dice, so they soften a bit more during the final cooking.

That’s pretty much it for this dish, other than a note to use a large dish, as it makes quite a lot.

Citrus, sultana & maple rice pudding with raspberries
The first time I cooked this I was in a bit of a quandary, as I know citrus juice curdles milk and there’s a lot of milk and citrus juice in this recipe. I did wonder if this was intentional, as there’s no reference to it in the recipe, but I suppose it must be. Just keep an eye on the milk and cream, it boils over in the blink of an eye, which can be a bit of a nightmare if you’re in the middle of doing something for the aduki bean gratin.

The recipe says to bake in the oven for an hour until most of the liquid has been absorbed. As you can see from the photos below, after an hour, there is still a load of liquid left. There is no mention of how still the rice pudding should be, so it be really stiff, or still quite runny when served? I used an extra ten grams of rice this time, but was still concerned that there was too much liquid left; maybe my oven isn’t as hot as it claims to be.

I might try using a blowtorch on the sugar crust next time, as sticking it under the grill results in the edges of the dish going all burnt and messy looking. Maybe I should just wipe the excess sugar off the edges, before it goes under the grill, but then I wouldn’t get to use the blowtorch…

These are both recipes that I’ll cook again, as they are both really, really nice. The best bit about cooking stuff that will feed six adults, when there are only three of you, is that you’re setup with leftovers for the next few days. Which means lunch at work is far, far tastier than anything the cafeteria serves up…