Iced London Buns

I’ve made these once before, they were lovely. Not sure why its taken me so long to make them again.

These Iced London Buns are from Justin Gellatly’s excellent book, Bread, Cake, Doughnut, Pudding. You can tell they’re going to be tasty, before you mix the dough. Even the caraway seeds, which at first glance seem a bit odd, smell right when they’re in the bowl with everything else.

Greedy ants...

Both times I’ve made these I’ve not been too happy with the shape of the buns. They don’t turn out like the iced buns you buy from the shops, which are generally touching and have to be pulled apart. This is no bad thing, depending on your point of view.

Proving...

I’m not sure what happened when they were in the oven, as they didn’t colour up very well. Even with an egg wash, they came out slightly anaemic and patchy, rather than the stated golden brown. Maybe if I’d just brushed them with egg yolk, rather than whole egg, they would have been less patchy, who knows.

Out of the oven...

While my icing skillz leave a lot to be desired, I was relatively happy with how the icing on these turned out. I can’t help thinking that the icing would’ve looked better if I’d used a letterbox type icing nozzle, rather than just chopping the end of the icing bag. I might have to invest in some bigger icing bags and some nozzles and try that next time.

Iced buns!

If you fancy making some iced buns, then you could do a lot worse than these. I’d definitely recommend giving them a try.

Patatas Bravas

Patatas Bravas is a Spanish tapas dish, of fried potato, with a spicy sauce.

Having decided to have a go at patatas bravas, I needed a recipe. Step forward Felicity Cloake and her How to cook the perfect… in the Guardian. I’m starting to think it’s probably worth buying a digital subscription. It would be worth it just for her column alone, let alone all the Yotam Ottolenghi and Anna Jones recipes too; it’s a great resource.

I followed the recipe, with a couple of changes. I don’t have any sherry vinegar for instance, so used red wine vinegar instead. I also hadn’t bothered to buy any chives. Other than that, it was straight down the line.

Having grown a few chillies this year, I decided to use one. I should’ve used more than one, as it turns out that they’re not as hot as last year. The tomato sauce had no heat to it what so ever. Which meant that it tasted very similar to the rich tomato sauce from The Geometry of Pasta.

Where the tomato sauce had been distinctly lacking any zing, the aioli had enough zing to raise the dead. It also made a lot. By a lot, I mean enough to slather on double the recipe and still feel like you’ve overdone it a bit.

This all made for a bit of a disappointing dish. Lacklustre tomato sauce, overly pokey and rich aioli, I was struggling to see why people rave about it.

Patatas Bravas, first attempt

In a twist of fate, I ended up having to buy another bag of Charlotte potatoes. So decided to have another crack at the recipe a few days later. I decided to change a few things.

Out when the homegrown chilli and in came homegrown chilli flakes, I know they’re hot. Rather than roasting the tatties at 200°C, I followed Yotam’s method for the potatoes in his Batata Harra recipe; so 240°C to get them good and crispy.

I also cooked the tomato sauce for longer, really reducing it to intensify the flavour and make it thicker. As I mentioned above, there was a lot of aioli left over, so I didn’t have to make any more of that.

This was almost a different dish. The heat and spiciness of the tomato sauce, the crunch of the tatties and the cool of the aioli. I can see why people rave about it.

I’ll definitely be making this again. Just have to think of a few other veggie tapas dishes to go with it…

Chocolate Truffles

I bought Maria Elia’s The Modern Vegetarian last year and if I’m being honest, I’ve not used it enough, not nearly enough. I’ve made a few things out of it though, including a couple of the batches of the chocolate truffles, using differing flavour combinations. The first one I tried, was the rosemary and sea salt combination, which I made as a Christmas present for my wife. They didn’t go down well…

I thought they are OK, which is just as well, as I ended up having to eat the lot! To be fair, they were quite strong, with the rosemary imparting quite a powerful taste. I’m not overly surprised that they polarised opinion in the house because of that. To make amends, I made my wife another batch of truffles, this time, using the pomegranate and mint flavour combination, mainly as I had some mint stalks left over and we have a bottle of pomegranate molasses in the house. These went down a lot better, although they still didn’t get finished.

This time it was the flavour of the pomegranate molasses that didn’t go down as well as it should have. It’s got quite a sharp sweet sour tang thing going on, and maybe I put it a bit too much in, I liked them though, even if they were a bit on the soft side. I think the next batch will use the cardamom and orange flavour combination, hopefully it’ll be third time lucky…